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Caesar's Rookie Quarterback Evaluation

By Authorccurrier
6/09/2017 1:08 pm
With the Postseason over, the top eight QBs in the country reported to the 2019 MFN Scouting Combine. Here is Caesar (A.K.A. Authorccurrier)’s take on the top signal-callers.

1: Broderick Huey, North Alabama: The 6’2”, 222 QB is almost flawless. He has the frame, the arm strength. He threw a ball 70 yards for a touchdown at the end of the 2017 season in the FCS Championship Game, a play that was gutsy, but gave the UNA Lions the victory in a 35-31 nail-biter over Northwood University with 00:03 left on the clock. He’s also very intelligent, and he started as a true freshman. He has led his team as a captain each of the past 4 years, and he nearly guided them to another Championship before North Alabama’s defense crumbled against Davenport in the semi-finals to close out the 2018 season. Huey is nearly impeccable. He turned heads with a 4.62 40-yard dash at the Combine. He’s normally a bit of a statue in the pocket, but when he does move, he’ll run away from the opposition. He also has a bit of a fumbling problem, but overall, you probably won’t see another like him for another five, ten years. I’m not guaranteeing him for Canton yet, but he has a very high ceiling, and despite being from a D2 school with high volatility, I think he’s a top-of-the-draft player.
Range: Top-10

2: Curtis Meyer, Colorado: Meyer is the consensus 2nd option at QB this year, and Huey doubters will say that Meyer is the best in this class. He ran the 2nd best 40 among QBs, with 4.56, but he’s only 206 lbs. He needs to bulk up if he wants to last, and so he’ll ideally probably run a 4.72 or so once he’s the right weight. Meyer played well in the Pac-12 this past year, beating three teams with defenders that have round 1-2 grades in Washington, Washington State, and USC. He guided his team to a 2nd place finish in the Pac-12 North. He has a bigger arm than anyone but Huey, and he’s much better at avoiding fumbles. Meyer is less volatile than Huey as a prospect, but still less of a sure thing than most would ideally want. Still, in a league where QB prospects are rare, I expect the top 4 to go in the first 2 rounds, and Meyer should go at the start of round 2, but will likely go a little higher.
Range: 1.20 – 2.10

3: Jerry Johnson, Oregon: Johnson has great size, with a 6’4”, 203 lbs. frame. He ran a 4.73, but he’ll probably run closer to a 4.85 when he’s filled out a bit. That’s solid speed, but he’s not a scrambler. His arm is smaller and less accurate than Meyer’s, but he has an excellent release and is smarter. He can read defenses very well, and he’s above average at reading the field and working through progressions. If he can improve his accuracy a little bit, I can see him becoming an above average starter in this league in a possession or smashmouth offense. He won’t make many mistakes, and he can be leaned upon to win games every once in a while, but he won’t be known for carving apart defenses. Still, he can be a starter, and he might be able to improve his accuracy to become one of the better starters in the league, though that’s not a given at all, and he has a proven track record after winning both the Pac-12 Championship and the Rose Bowl.
Range: 1.25-2.32

4: David Saylor, Azusa Pacific: Saylor is 6’2”, but he’s less than 200 lbs. That’s scary. He’s very mobile, though, and got the fastest 40 time in the Combine at 4.46. He will probably end up running a 4.6 if he fills out to where I like them (220-ish), but he will beat a team with his legs all day. He can scramble VERY well, and he’s very accurate. Personally, I think he’s the 2nd or 3rd best QB in this class, but he’s rated by many below Johnson. He’s the last one that will be drafted to be a starter, and he’s a scheme QB as a fast, mobile QB with some intelligence, average arm strength, and great accuracy. He’s somewhat similar to Andre Taylor or Solomon Mohr in league 73, and in blackflys’ scheme or my scheme, they’ve put up huge numbers as precise scheme QBs who can terrorize defenses. Still, he won’t be effective in most gameplans. He DID manage to win the FCS Championship this past year against Davenport, a team that best Broderick Huey. Saylor had the benefit of a stronger supporting cast with WR Aaron Turek (the no. 1 receiver in this class) and TE Christopher Davis (a fast receiving tight end, probably will be picked round 4-6), as well as C Dennis Lau (projected to be a 4th-5th round pick).
Range: 2.1-3.10

5: Wayne Long, Dartmouth: He’s a bit hefty at 6’2”, 233, so he’s not mobile, but that’s not a huge problem. He has an average arm, he’s intelligent, he can read the defense, and he has a good release, but he does have a pair of huge problems: he is not accurate, and he has tunnel vision on the field. More than any of the other top eight QBs, he will lock onto one receiver and if he’s not open, he will get sacked. He can’t work through progressions, and he probably never will. His accuracy is another really big problem. He can’t fit the ball into tight windows, and he has to play in a wide-open scheme as a result. If he can improve his accuracy (by at least 15) and his field of vision (by at least 15) in a year or two, he can become a developmental starter, but he seems to be more of a developmental backup type.
Range: 4.1-6.20

6: Frank Sumner, Tulsa: Unless something really special happens, he will be a developmental backup.
Range: 4.20-7.32

7: Kyle Ward, Penn State: Developmental 3rd QB. He actually some good athletic and QB ability, with solid accuracy, great strength, and a very good mind at identifying defensive formations, but he is too stupid to absorb a playbook to the required amount, he ran a 5.15 40 yard dash, he has a slow release, and he’s below average in nearly every other regard.
Range: 7.1-UDFA

8: Matthew Salmon, UNLV: Salmon is unlikely to be drafted, and if he is, it is because a team needs an emergency 3rd string QB.
Range: 7.1-UDFA

Re: Caesar's Rookie Quarterback Evaluation

By punisher
6/09/2017 4:20 pm
Authorccurrier wrote:
With the Postseason over, the top eight QBs in the country reported to the 2019 MFN Scouting Combine. Here is Caesar (A.K.A. Authorccurrier)’s take on the top signal-callers.


1: Broderick Huey, Other (Not North Alabama) = https://mfn83.myfootballnow.com/player/3650
Broderick Huey, North Alabama: The 6’2”, 222 QB is almost flawless. He has the frame, the arm strength. He threw a ball 70 yards for a touchdown at the end of the 2017 season in the FCS Championship Game, a play that was gutsy, but gave the UNA Lions the victory in a 35-31 nail-biter over Northwood University with 00:03 left on the clock. He’s also very intelligent, and he started as a true freshman. He has led his team as a captain each of the past 4 years, and he nearly guided them to another Championship before North Alabama’s defense crumbled against Davenport in the semi-finals to close out the 2018 season. Huey is nearly impeccable. He turned heads with a 4.62 40-yard dash at the Combine. He’s normally a bit of a statue in the pocket, but when he does move, he’ll run away from the opposition. He also has a bit of a fumbling problem, but overall, you probably won’t see another like him for another five, ten years. I’m not guaranteeing him for Canton yet, but he has a very high ceiling, and despite being from a D2 school with high volatility, I think he’s a top-of-the-draft player.
Range: Top-10

2: Curtis Meyer, Colorado = https://mfn83.myfootballnow.com/player/3783
Curtis Meyer, Colorado: Meyer is the consensus 2nd option at QB this year, and Huey doubters will say that Meyer is the best in this class. He ran the 2nd best 40 among QBs, with 4.56, but he’s only 206 lbs. He needs to bulk up if he wants to last, and so he’ll ideally probably run a 4.72 or so once he’s the right weight. Meyer played well in the Pac-12 this past year, beating three teams with defenders that have round 1-2 grades in Washington, Washington State, and USC. He guided his team to a 2nd place finish in the Pac-12 North. He has a bigger arm than anyone but Huey, and he’s much better at avoiding fumbles. Meyer is less volatile than Huey as a prospect, but still less of a sure thing than most would ideally want. Still, in a league where QB prospects are rare, I expect the top 4 to go in the first 2 rounds, and Meyer should go at the start of round 2, but will likely go a little higher.
Range: 1.20 – 2.10

3: Jerry Johnson , Oregon = https://mfn83.myfootballnow.com/player/3705
Jerry Johnson, Oregon: Johnson has great size, with a 6’4”, 203 lbs. frame. He ran a 4.73, but he’ll probably run closer to a 4.85 when he’s filled out a bit. That’s solid speed, but he’s not a scrambler. His arm is smaller and less accurate than Meyer’s, but he has an excellent release and is smarter. He can read defenses very well, and he’s above average at reading the field and working through progressions. If he can improve his accuracy a little bit, I can see him becoming an above average starter in this league in a possession or smashmouth offense. He won’t make many mistakes, and he can be leaned upon to win games every once in a while, but he won’t be known for carving apart defenses. Still, he can be a starter, and he might be able to improve his accuracy to become one of the better starters in the league, though that’s not a given at all, and he has a proven track record after winning both the Pac-12 Championship and the Rose Bowl.
Range: 1.25-2.32

4: David Saylor, Other (Not Azusa Pacific) = https://mfn83.myfootballnow.com/player/3621
David Saylor, Azusa Pacific: Saylor is 6’2”, but he’s less than 200 lbs. That’s scary. He’s very mobile, though, and got the fastest 40 time in the Combine at 4.46. He will probably end up running a 4.6 if he fills out to where I like them (220-ish), but he will beat a team with his legs all day. He can scramble VERY well, and he’s very accurate. Personally, I think he’s the 2nd or 3rd best QB in this class, but he’s rated by many below Johnson. He’s the last one that will be drafted to be a starter, and he’s a scheme QB as a fast, mobile QB with some intelligence, average arm strength, and great accuracy. He’s somewhat similar to Andre Taylor or Solomon Mohr in league 73, and in blackflys’ scheme or my scheme, they’ve put up huge numbers as precise scheme QBs who can terrorize defenses. Still, he won’t be effective in most gameplans. He DID manage to win the FCS Championship this past year against Davenport, a team that best Broderick Huey. Saylor had the benefit of a stronger supporting cast with WR Aaron Turek (the no. 1 receiver in this class) and TE Christopher Davis (a fast receiving tight end, probably will be picked round 4-6), as well as C Dennis Lau (projected to be a 4th-5th round pick).
Range: 2.1-3.10

5: Wayne Long, Dartmouth = https://mfn83.myfootballnow.com/player/3760
Wayne Long, Dartmouth: He’s a bit hefty at 6’2”, 233, so he’s not mobile, but that’s not a huge problem. He has an average arm, he’s intelligent, he can read the defense, and he has a good release, but he does have a pair of huge problems: he is not accurate, and he has tunnel vision on the field. More than any of the other top eight QBs, he will lock onto one receiver and if he’s not open, he will get sacked. He can’t work through progressions, and he probably never will. His accuracy is another really big problem. He can’t fit the ball into tight windows, and he has to play in a wide-open scheme as a result. If he can improve his accuracy (by at least 15) and his field of vision (by at least 15) in a year or two, he can become a developmental starter, but he seems to be more of a developmental backup type.
Range: 4.1-6.20

6: Frank Sumner, Tulsa = https://mfn83.myfootballnow.com/player/3747
Frank Sumner, Tulsa: Unless something really special happens, he will be a developmental backup.
Range: 4.20-7.32

7: Kyle Ward, Penn State = https://mfn83.myfootballnow.com/player/3799
Kyle Ward, Penn State: Developmental 3rd QB. He actually some good athletic and QB ability, with solid accuracy, great strength, and a very good mind at identifying defensive formations, but he is too stupid to absorb a playbook to the required amount, he ran a 5.15 40 yard dash, he has a slow release, and he’s below average in nearly every other regard.
Range: 7.1-UDFA

8: Matthew Salmon, UNLV = https://mfn83.myfootballnow.com/player/3612
Matthew Salmon, UNLV: Salmon is unlikely to be drafted, and if he is, it is because a team needs an emergency 3rd string QB.
Range: 7.1-UDFA

9. Michael Hanson , Appalachian State = https://mfn83.myfootballnow.com/player/3617
10. Elmer King , Louisiana State = https://mfn83.myfootballnow.com/player/3577
11.Thomas Evans , West Virginia = https://mfn83.myfootballnow.com/player/3802
12. Douglas Vaughn , Michigan State = https://mfn83.myfootballnow.com/player/3640


added each player's page to your thread
Last edited at 6/09/2017 4:22 pm

Re: Caesar's Rookie Quarterback Evaluation

By Authorccurrier
6/09/2017 4:25 pm
Thank you, punisher! I'll edit mine to officially have those added.

Re: Caesar's Rookie Quarterback Evaluation

By punisher
6/09/2017 4:44 pm
Authorccurrier wrote:
Thank you, punisher! I'll edit mine to officially have those added.



your welcome